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Zoom Fridtjof Wedel-Jarlsberg Nansen: 
Norwegian Explorer, Scientist, Diplomat, Humanitarian, and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate
Also a renown badass.

Fridtjof Wedel-Jarlsberg Nansen:

Norwegian Explorer, Scientist, Diplomat, Humanitarian, and Nobel Peace Prize Laureate

Also a renown badass.

10.10.11 26
Zoom Wrigley Field, Los Angles, CA (1925)
Home of the minor league team - The Los Angeles Angels - until 1957.

Wrigley Field, Los Angles, CA (1925)

Home of the minor league team - The Los Angeles Angels - until 1957.

08.03.11 4
Zoom John Wayne and Marguerite Churchill in “The Big Trail” (1930)
A Way of Life, Like Any Other is a fictionalization of Darcy O’Brien’s tumultuous childhood as the son of two movie stars.

John Wayne and Marguerite Churchill in “The Big Trail” (1930)

A Way of Life, Like Any Other is a fictionalization of Darcy O’Brien’s tumultuous childhood as the son of two movie stars.

08.01.11 2
Zoom Castro and Hemingway

Castro and Hemingway

07.22.11 104
Zoom Graham Greene

Graham Greene

07.20.11 7
Zoom Wallace Fard Muhammad
Minister and founder of the Nation of Islam. He established the Nation of Islam’s first mosque in Detroit, Michigan in 1930, and ministered his distinctive religion there for three years, before mysteriously disappearing in June 1934.

Wallace Fard Muhammad

Minister and founder of the Nation of Islam. He established the Nation of Islam’s first mosque in Detroit, Michigan in 1930, and ministered his distinctive religion there for three years, before mysteriously disappearing in June 1934.

07.11.11 13
Zoom Michigan Central Station

Michigan Central Station

07.11.11 15
Zoom Detroit, Michigan c. 1916  (Hotel Pontchartrain and Cadillac Square from City Hall)

Detroit, Michigan c. 1916  (Hotel Pontchartrain and Cadillac Square from City Hall)

07.11.11 6
Zoom Sen. Henry Cabot Lodge, 1898
The public voice of the Immigration Restriction League, Lodge argued on behalf of literacy tests for incoming immigrants, appealing to fears that unskilled foreign labor was undermining the standard of living for American workers and that a mass influx of uneducated immigrants would result in social conflict and national decline. Lodge was alarmed that large numbers of immigrants, primarily from Eastern and Southern Europe, were flooding into industrial centers, where the poverty of their home countries was being perpetuated and crime rates were rapidly rising. Lodge observed that these immigrants were “people whom it is very difficult to assimilate and do not promise well for the standard of civilization in the United States.” He felt that the United States should temporarily shut out all further entries, particularly persons of low education or skill, in order to more efficiently assimilate the millions who had come. From 1907 to 1911, he served on the Dillingham Commission, a joint congressional committee established to study the era’s immigration patterns and make recommendations to Congress based on its findings. The Commission’s recommendations led to the Immigration Act of 1917. It should be remembered, however, that Lodge was no rampant xenophobe, remarking once that “It [the U.S. flag] is the flag just as much of the man who was naturalized yesterday as of the man whose people have been here many generations.”  In an address to The New England Society of Brooklyn:
"Let every man honor and love the land of his birth and the race from which he springs and keep their memory green. It is a pious and honorable duty. But let us have done with British-Americans and Irish-Americans and German-Americans, and so on, and all be Americans…If a man is going to be an American at all let him be so without any qualifying adjectives; and if he is going to be something else, let him drop the word American from his personal description."

Sen. Henry Cabot Lodge, 1898

The public voice of the Immigration Restriction League, Lodge argued on behalf of literacy tests for incoming immigrants, appealing to fears that unskilled foreign labor was undermining the standard of living for American workers and that a mass influx of uneducated immigrants would result in social conflict and national decline. Lodge was alarmed that large numbers of immigrants, primarily from Eastern and Southern Europe, were flooding into industrial centers, where the poverty of their home countries was being perpetuated and crime rates were rapidly rising. Lodge observed that these immigrants were “people whom it is very difficult to assimilate and do not promise well for the standard of civilization in the United States.” He felt that the United States should temporarily shut out all further entries, particularly persons of low education or skill, in order to more efficiently assimilate the millions who had come. From 1907 to 1911, he served on the Dillingham Commission, a joint congressional committee established to study the era’s immigration patterns and make recommendations to Congress based on its findings. The Commission’s recommendations led to the Immigration Act of 1917. It should be remembered, however, that Lodge was no rampant xenophobe, remarking once that “It [the U.S. flag] is the flag just as much of the man who was naturalized yesterday as of the man whose people have been here many generations.”  In an address to The New England Society of Brooklyn:

"Let every man honor and love the land of his birth and the race from which he springs and keep their memory green. It is a pious and honorable duty. But let us have done with British-Americans and Irish-Americans and German-Americans, and so on, and all be Americans…If a man is going to be an American at all let him be so without any qualifying adjectives; and if he is going to be something else, let him drop the word American from his personal description."


07.11.11 12
Zoom Smyrna in Flames (1922)

Smyrna in Flames (1922)

07.08.11 29
Zoom St. Sulpice, Paris

St. Sulpice, Paris

07.06.11 13
Zoom Joseph Stalin, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Winston Churchill on the portico of the Russian Embassy during the Tehran Conference, 1943.

Joseph Stalin, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Winston Churchill on the portico of the Russian Embassy during the Tehran Conference, 1943.

06.28.11 34
Zoom Destruction of the original Church of Christ the Savior in Moscow, Russia, 1931

Destruction of the original Church of Christ the Savior in Moscow, Russia, 1931

06.28.11 30
Zoom The first icebreaker Krasin (Russian: Красин) was built for the Imperial Russian Navy as Svyatogor in 1916. She had a long, distinguished career in rescue operations, as well as a pathfinder and explorer of the Northern Sea Route. She has been fully restored to operating condition and is now a museum ship in Saint Petersburg.

The first icebreaker Krasin (RussianКрасин) was built for the Imperial Russian Navy as Svyatogor in 1916. She had a long, distinguished career in rescue operations, as well as a pathfinder and explorer of the Northern Sea Route. She has been fully restored to operating condition and is now a museum ship in Saint Petersburg.

06.28.11 5